AN ESTABLISHED SIGNS COMPANY

IN FT LAUDERDALE, FL

SIGN MANUFACTURING

SIGN DESIGN

SIGN INSTALLATION

SIGN PERMITTING

SIGN SURVEY

SIGN RESPAIR AND MAINTENANCE

FREE ESTIMATES

305.694.0464

SIGNS COMPANY IN FT LAUDERDALE, FL

In 1947, in Cienfuegos, Cuba, Jose machin Sr, established Luminicos Machin.

For the next two decades this family operated business, designed, created, and maintained neon and plastic signs for major corporations across the Island, in Colombia and Venezuela.

 

Cafe Pilon, Texaco, Shell, Cadillac, GE, Nestle, Pepsi Cola, and many other companies made up the corporate client roster.

 

Forced to close its doors because of the revolution, the Machin family was forced to disperse and after many years re-established itself and Luminicos Machin under the new name Machin Signs, Inc in Miami, Florida.

 

Jose Machin Jr Runs and operates Machin Signs, Inc, with the same pride and that made Luminicos Machin the great success it was in Cuba and South America for many years.

 

A fully licensed, minority owned business, the Company guarantees customer satisfaction with each design and installation.

 

 

WHAT WE DO

 

Sign Manufacturing & Sign Installation in Miami of all types of signs, electrical and nonelectrical. Metal, Plastic & board signs, laminated sign, polished signs, high rise signs, banners, real estate signs, frame signs, lobbies signs, parking lots signs, directional signs. We service shopping centers, restaurants, service/fuel stations, Neon, L.E.D both outdoors & indoors.

 

Front-lit Channel Letters, Embossed Plastic, Light Boxes, Multi-tenant Pylon Signs, Single Pylon Signs, Monument Signs, L.E.D. Displays, Mobile Billboards, Vehicles Wraps, Interior, Signage, Banners, Reverse Chanel letters, Retail Signage

 

Call Us today to get a quote 305.694.0464 or 786.292.3455

 

 

FT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA SIGNS COMPANY

Fort Lauderdale (/ˈlɔːdərdeɪl/) is a city in the U.S. state of Florida, 28 miles (45 km) north of Miami. It is the county seat of Broward County. The city has an estimated population of 180,072 as of the 2017 census.[10] Fort Lauderdale is a principal city of the Miami metropolitan area, which was home to an estimated 6,158,824 people in 2017.[11]

The city is a popular tourist destination, with an average year-round temperature of 75.5 °F (24.2 °C) and 3,000 hours of sunshine per year. Greater Fort Lauderdale, encompassing all of Broward County, hosted 12 million visitors in 2012, including 2.8 million international visitors. In 2012, the county collected $43.9 million from the 5% hotel tax it charges, after hotels in the area recorded an occupancy rate for the year of 72.7 percent and an average daily rate of $114.48. The district has 561 hotels and motels comprising nearly 35,000 rooms. Forty-six cruise ships sailed from Port Everglades in 2012. Greater Fort Lauderdale has over 4,000 restaurants, 63 golf courses, 12 shopping malls, 16 museums, 132 nightclubs, 278 parkland campsites, and 100 marinas housing 45,000 resident yachts.[12]

Fort Lauderdale is named after a series of forts built by the United States during the Second Seminole War. The forts took their name from Major William Lauderdale (1782–1838), younger brother of Lieutenant Colonel James Lauderdale. William Lauderdale was the commander of the detachment of soldiers who built the first fort.[13] However, development of the city did not begin until 50 years after the forts were abandoned at the end of the conflict.

Three forts named "Fort Lauderdale" were constructed: the first was at the fork of the New River, the second was at Tarpon Bend on the New River between the present-day Colee Hammock and Rio Vista neighborhoods, and the third was near the site of the Bahia Mar Marina.

The area in which the city of Fort Lauderdale would later be founded was inhabited for more than two thousand years by the Tequesta Indians.[14] Contact with Spanish explorers in the 16th century proved disastrous for the Tequesta, as the Europeans unwittingly brought with them diseases, such as smallpox, to which the native populations possessed no resistance. For the Tequesta, disease, coupled with continuing conflict with their Calusa neighbors, contributed greatly to their decline over the next two centuries.[15] By 1763, there were only a few Tequesta left in Florida, and most of them were evacuated to Cuba when the Spanish ceded Florida to the British in 1763, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1763), which ended the Seven Years' War.[14] Although control of the area changed between SpainUnited Kingdom, the United States, and the Confederate States of America, it remained largely undeveloped until the 20th century.

The Fort Lauderdale area was known as the "New River Settlement" before the 20th century. In the 1830s there were approximately 70 settlers living along the New River. William Cooley, the local Justice of the Peace, was a farmer and wrecker, who traded with the Seminole Indians. On January 6, 1836, while Cooley was leading an attempt to salvage a wrecked ship, a band of Seminoles attacked his farm, killing his wife and children, and the children's tutor. The other farms in the settlement were not attacked, but all the white residents in the area abandoned the settlement, fleeing first to the Cape Florida Lighthouse on Key Biscayne, and then to Key West.[16]

The first United States stockade named Fort Lauderdale was built in 1838,[17] and subsequently was a site of fighting during the Second Seminole War. The fort was abandoned in 1842, after the end of the war, and the area remained virtually unpopulated until the 1890s. It was not until Frank Stranahan arrived in the area in 1893 to operate a ferry across the New River, and the Florida East Coast Railroad's completion of a route through the area in 1896, that any organized development began. The city was incorporated in 1911, and in 1915 was designated the county seat of newly formed Broward County.[18]

Fort Lauderdale's first major development began in the 1920s, during the Florida land boom.[19] The 1926 Miami Hurricane[20] and the Great Depression of the 1930s caused a great deal of economic dislocation. In July 1935, an African-American man named Rubin Stacy was accused of robbing a white woman at knife point. He was arrested and being transported to a Miami jail when police were run off the road by a mob. A group of 100 white men proceeded to hang Stacy from a tree near the scene of his alleged robbery. His body was riddled with some twenty bullets.[21] The murder was subsequently used by the press in Nazi Germany to discredit US critiques of its own persecution of Jews, Communists, and Catholics.[22]

When World War II began, Fort Lauderdale became a major US base, with a Naval Air Station to train pilots, radar operators, and fire control operators. A Coast Guard base at Port Everglades was also established.[23]

On July 4, 1961 African Americans started a series of protests, wade-ins, at beaches that were off-limits to them, to protest "the failure of the county to build a road to the Negro beach".[24][25] On July 11, 1962 a verdict by Ted Cabot went against the city's policy of racial segregation of public beaches.

Today, Fort Lauderdale is a major yachting center,[26] one of the nation's largest tourist destinations,[26] and the center of a metropolitan division with 1.8 million people.*

Source:

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Lauderdale,_Florida

We service the following zip codes in the city of Fort Lauderdale, Florida:

33004, 33301, 33304, 33305, 33306, 33308, 33309, 33311, 33312, 33315, 33316, 33317, 33319, 33334.

SERVING THE FOLLOWING CITIES IN FLORIDA

 Homestead, Pine Crest, Cutler Bay, Coral Gables, Doral, Ft Lauderdale,

Hollywood, Plantation, Weston, Coral Springs, Sunrise, West Palm Beach 

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